IKE

Drying Leafy Herbs

by:IKE     2019-05-25

In my herb garden, thyme, Niu Zhi and mouse Lee have just begun to show their buds, which reminds me that now is the best time to dry some for winter use. I like to use fresh herbs in cooking, but I hate to buy them in small plastic containers at grocery stores when my own herbal garden is snowing. Who knows how long they 've been in that package, and many of them don't last long until you take them home. So what I do for winter herbs is to use one of the oldest and easiest preservation methods --drying. When the oil responsible for flavor and aroma reaches its peak before flowering, herbs should be harvested. Once flowering begins, the yield of the leaves usually drops and the leaves lose some flavor. When there are enough leaves to maintain growth, you can start harvesting herbs for leaves. In the morning, after the dew is dry before the hot weather evaporates some essential oils, cut the small branches from your plants. Do not wash the plants if they are clean. 

Otherwise, rinse the dust and dirt, shake them to remove moisture, and spread them out with napkins or screens until they dry. Once they are dry, remove any dead leaves, tie them to small bundles, and hang them dry where the air is in good circulation but away from direct light. You can also place a clean paper bag on a herbal bundle to control light and possible dust accumulation. Make sure there are some vents on the bag so the air can flow.I found that the easiest to dry was Bali, mouse plum, delicious, marjoram rosemary, and oregano. Mint, leeks, tarragon, basil, and parsley need to be dried quickly so they don't mold, so drying is done in a different way or using other preservation methods such as freezing. The length of time the herbs dry will vary depending on temperature and air movement. If you hang them in the kitchen, close to the stove, and a good draft, they can dry in a few hours.If dry in a closet or storage room with little air circulation, they may need 4-7 days. You will know that when the main stems of herbs are cracked, not bent, and the leaves become brittle, they are completely dry. I found that drying the herbs to dry is the best way to dehydrate because adding heat reduces the taste and changes the color of the leaves. Another drying method is to use a dehydrator. The dehydrator is dryxa0Fast and easy because the temperature and air circulation can be controlled. The pre-the thermostat is set to a hot dehydrator of 95 degrees Fahrenheit to 15 degrees Fahrenheit.After making sure the herbs are clean and dry, place them in a single layer on the dehydrator tray. The drying time may vary from 1 hour to 4 hours. If it is not convenient to Hang herbs to dry, you can also dry them in the oven. For herbs with higher moisture content such as mint, tarragon, and basil, this is a great way to do it. Instead of tying them in a pile, remove the leaves from the stem and place them on a layer of biscuit paper. Dry in the oven setting as low as possible. Turn the herb branches during partial drying and occasionally open the oven to release moisture. If you have a convection oven, the drying time will be further shortened and should be less than 2 hours.--xa0In the gas stove, the pilot's heat may be all the heat you need to dry your herbs overnight. When the leaves are dry, peel the leaves from the stem and discard the stem. You can crush the leaves, but keep in mind that the whole herb retains a longer flavor than crushed, ground or rubbed herbs. Store dried herbs in a closed container glass jar with lid, ceramic crocks or zipper-lock storage bag-Away from the light.\ "So for everything in the garden, whether it's salad or fruit, the poor will eat better than the rich without fruit and have their own food. This is all the necessary and useful information I think about this topic.                                

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